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Knowles Corporation’s competitors have higher revenue and earnings than Knowles Corporation. Knowles Corporation is trading at a lower price-to-earnings ratio than its competitors, indicating that it is currently the more affordable than other companies in its industry.

Institutional and Insider Ownership
62.2% of shares of all “Computer Hardware” companies are owned by institutional investors. 2.2% of Knowles Corporation shares are owned by company insiders. Comparatively, 13.8% of shares of all “Computer Hardware” companies are owned by company insiders. Strong institutional ownership is an indication that endowments, large money managers and hedge funds believe a stock will outperform the market over the long term.

Profitability
This table compares Knowles Corporation and its competitors’ net margins, return on equity and return on assets.

Knowles Corporation is a global supplier of micro-acoustic, audio processing and specialty component solutions, serving the mobile consumer electronics, communications, medical, military, aerospace and industrial markets. The Company operates through two segments: Mobile Consumer Electronics (MCE) and Specialty Components (SC). MCE designs and manufactures acoustic products, including microphones and audio processing technologies used in mobile handsets, wearables and other consumer electronic devices. SC specializes in the design and manufacture of specialized electronic components used in medical and life science applications, as well as solutions and components used in communications infrastructure and a range of other markets. It has sales, support and engineering facilities in North America, Europe and Asia, and manufacturing facilities in Asia. It also offers acoustics components used in hearing aids, as well as high-end oscillators (timing devices) and capacitors.

Charlottesville election officials last week reported that after the June 13 primary, they lost a small computer containing names, personal addresses and assigned polling places of voters in Charlottesville and Albemarle County. The information on the computer is pared down from data that is publicly accessible in the city election office.

Officials said there is no risk of voter fraud, but the loss of city property and an apparent failure to properly manage and track the equipment has led to a few changes in the city registrar’s office.

After a more comprehensive inventory of its equipment this summer, election department staff discovered one of its electronic poll book devices is also missing, and could have been lost in 2015, according to recent Electoral Board meeting minutes.

“The inventory processes need to be improved and we are doing that now,” said City Registrar Rosanna Bencoach.

In an interview Monday, Bencoach said an IT technician in her department is no longer working there. She declined to say whether the technician responsible for tracking the devices was fired or quit.

“Three Charlottesville precincts received two devices and the other six received one,” a news release from last week said of the Dell Inspiron 1012 minicomputer. “After initial review of the election materials, equipment and supplies returned to the office on election night and the following day, one of the devices could not be located.”

Charitybuzz today launched an auction for a rare Apple-1 computer known as the "Schoolsky" Apple-1. The Schoolsky Apple-1 earned its name from Adam Schoolsky, who was gifted the computer by Steve Wozniak when he worked at Apple. It was never sold to the public.

David Larson, who purchased the computer from Adam Schoolsky in 1994, is selling it via Charitybuzz. The Apple-1 was constructed by Steve Wozniak and it is in working condition.

It comes with an original Apple-1 operation manual, original box, Apple-1 Cassette Interface Card and early cassette, an original advertisement for the Apple-1, three issues of 1970s magazine the Silicon Gulch Gazette, a conference program for the first West Coast Computer Faire, a letter from Adam Schoolsky to David Larson, a drawing from original Apple employee Ron Wayne, and more.

The Apple-1 Cassette Interface Card in particular is a rare find with an Apple-1, as most of the surviving machines do not include it. The card is designed to allow the Apple-1 to be connected to a cassette recorder.

Back when the company was first founded, Apple made 175 Apple-1 machines by hand. Only 50 to 60 of the machines still exist today, and just a handful of those are functional.

Previous Apple-1 auctions have brought in up to $905,000. The last Charitybuzz auction for an Apple-1, the "Celebration" model, sold for $815,000.

A portion of the proceeds from the Charitybuzz auction will benefit the Foundation for Amateur International Radio Service, aka FAIRS. Founded in 1991, FAIRS educates citizens about disaster preparedness and provides radio equipment and technology for areas in need.

The originally proposed requirement that records be kept of all transactions, and that all items purchased by a shop be held for at least 15 days before they are re-sold, were revised following complaints from secondhand-shop owners that keeping so many records would be burdensome. The business owners said keeping all items they take in for that long would require storage space they don’t have, and potentially even put them out of business.

In response, city police, who drafted the ordinance in an effort to make it easier to track down stolen items, now propose to change the requirement that secondhand stores create and maintain records of each purchase so it only applies to nine types of items, which police said are most likely to be stolen, and then only if the item is valued at more than $50.

The nine listed types of items that still will require record-keeping, if they are of more than $50 in value, are video game systems, televisions, digital photography and video equipment, mobile phones, GPS devices, computer equipment and related items, power tools, firearms, and jewelry.

“We have been meeting with the business owners who had concerns in the past and I believe this change addresses their concerns,” Deputy Chief Jared Mills said. “By only including items that are usually stolen, … it excludes the business owners who are trying to do the right thing. The original ordinance would have inundated them with paperwork and caused them to have to purchase or rent storage units to hold the property.”

Mills said the proposed ordinance was revised, by the city’s attorney, after officials met with shop owners to discuss their concerns.

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