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Both the Alienware 15 and 17 will feature Intel Core i7 processors, Nvidia 10-series GPUs, and DDR4 memory running at up to 2,667Mhz. Both machines will have a 68 watt-hour lithium ion battery, with the option to upgrade to a 99 watt-hour battery. (According to Alienware, the upgraded battery is the largest it could use without running into issues with FAA flight regulations). The 15 features a 15.6″ display. The 17 has a 17.3″ display. Both have 1080p IPS screens with an anti-glare coating.The new design, which looks considerably sleeker and more refined compared to your average gaming laptop, uses anodized aluminum and magnesium alloy to keep weight down. Steel reinforcements keep the laptop stiff and sturdy, and copper pieces help with thermal management.As teased earlier this week, the Alienware 17 will also feature a camera with built-in Tobii eye-tracking. The laptop will come with an exclusive app, Ovenwolf, which allows players to record and study detailed feedback on where they most focus during fast-paced, competitive gameplay.

Both the 15 and 17 have cameras that support Windows Hello and support Alienware’s proprietary HD+IR presence detection, which can dim down the screen and other lights (like the keyboard) when you look away.In addition to the 15- and 17-inch notebooks, Alienware will reveal and release a new 13-inch gaming laptop in November. Like its larger brothers, the 13-inch model will be considerably thinner — about 20 percent — and have a Nvidia 10-series GPU. You can expect more information about the Alienware 15 and 17 this fall, followed by the launch of the Alienware 13 in November.User metrics are incredibly important for social media companies, since advertisers follow eyeballs. As such, slowing user growth was easily the first red flag that investors noticed when Snap filed its S-1 Registration Statement with the SEC in February of this year ahead of its March IPO. As it turns out, larger rival Facebook already knew that user growth on Snapchat was quickly decelerating.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Facebook had an inside track due to its acquisition of Onavo a few years back, a small mobile-analytics company that reportedly fetched $100 million to $200 million. Onavo had two main offerings: technology that helped optimize performance and battery life, as well as analytics that could help developers understand the marketplace. Facebook initially said the primary purpose for the acquisition was Onavo's data compression technology, which could help with its efforts to bring internet connectivity to emerging markets.However, Onavo's analytics gave Facebook an early preview as to how Snapchat was performing, even when it was still a private company. Specifically, Facebook knew that Snapchat didn't add many users in Q4 2016.The Onavo Protect app that is available on iOS and Android is billed as a way for users to keep data secure and private by creating a virtual private network (VPN). This can be useful in protecting against malicious sites or phishing attempts.The iOS App Store listing makes it clear: "To provide this layer of protection, Onavo establishes a secure connection used to direct all of your network communications through Onavo's servers. As part of this process, Onavo receives and analyzes information about your mobile data and app use." What's less clear upfront is that "Onavo's servers" really means "Facebook's servers."

The App Store doesn't list how many times an app has been downloaded, but Google Play does: between 10 million and 50 million Android users have downloaded Onavo Protect. Citing data from Sensor Tower, the app has been downloaded 24 million times (mostly Android), according to the Journal .Snapchat is much more popular on iOS, and its Android app has been plagued with performance problems that have hurt its appeal on that platform, adversely affecting user growth. "The majority of our user engagement is on smartphones with iOS operating systems. As a result, although our products work with Android mobile devices, we have prioritized development of our products to operate with iOS operating systems rather than smartphones with Android operating systems," Snap writes in SEC filings.It's this routing of traffic through Facebook's servers that gave it insight into how Snapchat was faring. The dominant social network is able to analyze the traffic data to see what apps people use, which Facebook reportedly then uses in planning its product roadmap and considering what services to develop. While 24 million downloads of Onavo Protect certainly doesn't cover the entire installed base, it's quite statistically significant, so Facebook could derive some meaningful competitive insights.

This report is one of a couple ironic (and somewhat shady) storylines recently. Facebook is reportedly interested in developing video chatting hardware, which might be able to monitor you at all times using artificial intelligence; Mark Zuckerberg tapes over his laptop's webcam and microphone due to privacy concerns.Now, Facebook appears to be using a data security and encryption app to glean insights into user behavior. It wouldn't be a stretch to say that Onavo Protect is effectively a form of spyware (which some user reviews argue that it is), even if users blindly agree to the terms and conditions.Generally, it is very possible — my job at Business Insider is internet-based, so as long as I have internet access, I can do about 90% of my job on any given day.At the office, I have a huge monitor, but at home, I have to use my laptop. It's perfect for idle online shopping and FaceTime, but less perfect for editing slideshows and seeing the captions on full-size photos, while keeping Slack open in another window. It's annoying to be without my bookmarked resources and the carefully chosen dock at the bottom of my desktop.

And the worst? The worst was the trackpad.If you have a writing-heavy (or Excel-heavy; I hear we're in the same boat) job, you know the trackpad is an exercise in frustration. It makes copy/paste — a go-to, practically involuntary task — an enormous, blundering pain.Before your eyes roll all the way back in your head, let me just say that it took me years to buy a mouse. Years of spending 30 minutes on a 10-minute task, years of trying to find a workaround so I wouldn't have to scroll to the bottom of a page, years of thinking to myself "I should really get a mouse."So when I became an Amazon Prime member during its annual discount (I'm still in my first year of membership; verdict to come) I shelled out $6 for a plain black, wired, AmazonBasics mouse with free shipping. It arrived a few days later, and I was shocked by the difference it made in my productivity outside the office.

I chose an old-school wired mouse because a) I didn't want to trap myself in an endless loop of hunting down batteries and figuring out why it wasn't connecting to my computer and b) it was $6. So far it's — dare I say — revolutionized my workflow on the odd days I telecommute. The other day, working from home while waiting on a delivery, I might have even been more productive than I am in the office.Anyway, I'm under no illusions that I've stumbled across some incredible productivity secret unknown to the modern worker until now. All I did was stop procrastinating. But isn't that the hardest part?If you, too, find your at-home setup is keeping you from accomplishing what you need when you're working from home (assuming that's a possibility for you, as I well know it's not for everyone), take it from me: Buy the mouse.Because voice recognition software is still prone to embarrassing errors, typing remains the best way to enter information into a computer. If you want the most comfortable and efficient keyboard, the Das Keyboard 4 Professional keyboard is for you. It’s durable with great tactile feedback and has many specialized control keys. If you dislike typing, you’ve probably been waiting … and waiting … and waiting for voice recognition software to finally live up to the hype. But after seeing the voice recognition software turn statements like “call Aunt Sally” into “small ants rally” or “touchdown pass” into “much clown gas,” you realize your keyboard isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

Since you’re going to have to live with that keyboard for the foreseeable future, maybe it’s time to consider an upgrade. If you’re tired of your keyboard not having a numeric keypad, not providing enough tactile feedback, or not having a J keycap anymore, we have collected a list of some of the best keyboards you can buy.Whether you’re a typist with perfect form — thanks to Miss Jarvis in sixth grade and the thousands of times she emphasized the home position — or you’re a hunt-and-peck typist, having a great keyboard can at least make the job more enjoyable and more comfortable.When purchasing a new keyboard, think about how you’ll use it. Some people just want a new basic keyboard to plug into a desktop computer that doesn’t have so many crumbs inside it that every other keystroke sticks. But others will want a keyboard that can perform a specific function.

Gaming: A gaming keyboard will have fast response times, recording multiple keystrokes quickly. They also have pleasing aesthetics and use lighting to enhance the experience, as Tom’s Guide explains. They may offer extra keys you can program for certain gaming needs. Mechanical: A mechanical keyboard is popular, as it has great tactile feedback, while also providing that satisfying “clack” noise that clearly identifies a successful keystroke. If you type fast with a light touch, mechanical keyboards will record those keystrokes well, according to Engadget. Mobile: Keyboards designed to be used with tablets or smartphones will be thinner and smaller than a standard keyboard to make them easier to carry. They may even fold for transport. Music: If you often play music on your computer, having a keyboard that includes special buttons for volume control and track skipping is a smart idea, according to Lifewire. Specialty: Many types of keyboards exist that will perform specific functions, such as for software coding or with certain types of language layouts. Standard: A standard keyboard is exactly what you’d expect it to be, a general type of keyboard with all of the keys you’d expect to find. It will work well in a multitude of situations, giving it plenty of flexibility, and it usually doesn’t cost very much.Key features of keyboards

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